1. What do you do as an Arts Education Coordinator for BOPA?

As the Arts Education coordinator, I get to facilitate the Bright StARTs program, which places teaching artist in out of school time sites for workshops in various artistic disciplines; the Youth Arts Council, a team of BCPS high schoolers, dedicated to the arts; and the Fred Art Prize, a $1000 scholarship for high school-aged Baltimore City residents, which also offers a showing at Artscape. I also get to be involved in various programming with BOPA festivals and events, and act as the BOPA representative for various educational initiatives in Baltimore.

2. Who is a part of the Youth Arts Council? What are the main goals?

The council is comprised of around a dozen Baltimore City High School students. We meet together during the school year to discuss opportunities for teens in Baltimore City. This past year we were active with the Baltimore Arts Education Initiative Steering Committee (run by Arts Everyday), adding students’ voices to the conversation surrounding arts education policy standards in Baltimore. I like to think of them as the bureaucratic warriors in the battle for equitable arts education. The council members are also involved in programming for Light City and Artscape and are given opportunities to hear about internships and meet with city leaders. I hope that every year the council can grow to reflect the agendas of those involved.

3. Why are programs like the nearly three decades-old Bright StARTS Art Program important?

There is blatant inequality with arts education street by street, neighborhood by neighborhood in Baltimore. Programs like Bright StARTs are a way to offer quality arts experiences in locations that aren’t typically able to host them because of monetary limitation.

4. How do professional artists/educators become teaching artists in Bright StARTS?

Follow this link! All of the information about the position is available. We are searching for teaching artists who have experience working with kids in Baltimore City and who recognize arts education as a form of therapy and healing. This is also an amazing opportunity for artists who wish to expand the educational aspect of their practices.

5. Where were you before joining BOPA’s staff?

I spent a year working for Bloomberg School of Public Health doing administrative work for a children’s research study. I learned so much during my time there, and I learned a lot about scope, and what I’m NOT good at. Before that I have been a teaching artist in Baltimore City Public Schools and various non-profits. Working directly with young people and artistic programming is where I belong.

6. Outside of BOPA, are you involved in the city’s arts and cultural scene? If so, how?

Since graduating Goucher College in 2008, I have been active in Baltimore’s exciting theater arts scene. I have collaborated with multiple theater companies including Submersive Productions, Stillpointe Theatre Initiative, Single Carrot Theater and the Baltimore Rock Opera Society as a performer, dancer and director.

7. How can the arts continue to revitalize the city in the future?

I believe that arts education is the most accessible form of character education. Quality arts education is the most practical solution to address the problems of bullying, violence and issues with communication. Plus, practicing art is fun!

Image credit: Jeff & Aisha Butler of Jazzy Studios

Baltimore-based artist Megan Lewis has been chosen to create new public artwork for the Penn-North Metro SubwayLink station. The inclusion of the artwork, which is intended to focus on the history and culture of the Penn-North community, is part of North Avenue Rising, a project that includes transportation investments across the North Avenue corridors and is supported by a U.S. Department of Transportation (USDOT) Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery (TIGER) grant.  The North Avenue Rising will improve transit connectivity and accessibility along the East to West North Avenue corridor, while the investment in new artwork will improve the commuter experience within the station and provide visitors an opportunity for self-reflection.

The artwork created by Lewis will be the first new artwork commissioned for the Baltimore Metro SubwayLink system since the stations were built more than 30 years ago, and will be the first artwork by a black woman artist commissioned for Maryland’s transit system. Lewis joins the ranks of artists like Romare Bearden, Patricia Alexander, Paul Daniels, Mary Ann Mears and others who have artwork commissions located along the Baltimore Metro SubwayLink line.

The North Avenue Rising Penn-North Station project is Lewis’s first public art commission. The artist has been an active and well-regarded member of Baltimore’s arts community. A past Greater Baltimore Cultural Alliance Urban Arts Leadership Fellow, Lewis began translating her work into public murals in the summer of 2015 through Art @ Work, an award-winning partnership between BOPA and Jubilee Arts. Since that time, she has been an Art @ Work teaching artist four years in a row, and has completed seven murals across the city. Her mural, Lady Liberty Please Know Thy Self, located at 1800 Baker Street, made national news when singer-songwriter Alicia Keys visited Baltimore for “Shining a Light: A Concert for Progress on Race in America” presented by A+E Networks. The artist will begin designing the artwork for the station this fall, with installation scheduled in 2020.

Meet Lewis and hear about her creative process during an artist talk on Wednesday, October 24, 2018 from 6pm to 8pm at Arch Social Club, located at 2426 Pennsylvania Avenue, Baltimore, MD 21217. The event is hosted by Cultureworks and part of BOPA’s Free Fall Baltimore.

***

More information on North Avenue Rising can be found at www.northavenuerising.com.

APPLICATION OPENS THURSDAY, AUGUST 16 FOR

MECU NEIGHBORHOOD EVENT GRANTS FOR 2019

New This Year – Eligible Groups Can Receive Up To $5,000

 

The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) announces the application for MECU Neighborhood Event Grants for 2019. The program awards cash grants to Baltimore City non-profit neighborhood associations and community-based organizations for the purpose of producing a free-to-the-public event for the community and residents they currently serve. Special must focus on at least one of the following area: education, arts and culture, or community development. New this year, with additional support from MECU, eligible groups can receive up to $5,000. Applications will be available starting Thursday, August 16, 2018atwww.promotionandarts.org. The deadline for submissions is Sunday, October 7, 2018. The MECU Neighborhood Event Grants program is administered by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts and supported by presenting sponsor MECU, Baltimore’s Credit Union, in addition to the Baltimore City Department of Housing & Community Development (DHCD).

“We are proud to support the MECU Neighborhood Event Grants program for the seventh straight year,” said MECU President and CEO John Hamilton. “By increasing the maximum dollar amount, we’re excited to see even larger community events in the coming year.”

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2018 Baker Artist Award Finalists:

FILM:
Charles CohenDina FiasconaroJonna McKoneMiceal O’DonnellMargaret Rorison

INTERDISCIPLINARY:
Erick Antonio BenitezAbraham BuricksonGraham Coreil-AllenJeffrey L. GangwischFred ScharmenStewart Watson

LITERARY:
Leslie HarrisonDora MalechJen MichalskiTimmy ReedJung Yun

MUSIC:
Judah AdashiLafayette GilchristLura JohnsonBonnie JonesVon Vargas

PERFORMANCE:
Christine FerreraRyan JohnsonMeshelle, The Indie Mom of ComedyLisi Stoessel

VISUAL:
Laura AmussenNoa HeyneChristine NeillDavid PageRachel RotenbergAmy SheraldSusan Waters-Eller

The 2018 Baker Artist Awardees will be announced on a special episode of Maryland Public Television’s Artworks program, which will air on May 18, 2018.

Finalists have also been invited to participate in a variety of showcases that will take place throughout Baltimore in the coming months. Stay tuned!

Dollar General, Olney, Illinois, 2017

The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) and the Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City (MASOB) are happy to announce the recipient of the Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City Artist Travel Prize, Nate Larson. Selected from a highly competitive pool of applicants, Nate will use the $6,000 award to work on his project “Centroid Towns,” a long-term photographic project documenting towns that have been the mean center (meaning the geographical point that describes a centerpoint of a region’s population) of the United States. This travel grant will facilitate travel to two towns in Indiana to continue his work focusing on issues of immigration, incarceration and their relationship to national identity.

Currently based out of Baltimore, Maryland, Nate Larson is a contemporary artist working with photographic media, artist books and digital video. Most of his current artwork, research, and collaborations explore the linkage between human experience and the site on which it happened through technological, cultural, and historical threads.

His projects have been widely exhibited across the United States and internationally as well as featured in numerous publications and media outlets, including Wired, The Guardian, The Picture Show from NPR, Slate, CNN, Hyperallergic, Gizmodo, Buzzfeed News, Vice Magazine, the New York Times, Utne Reader, Hotshoe Magazine, Flavorwire, the BBC News Viewfinder, Frieze Magazine, the British Journal of Photography, APM’s Marketplace Tech Report, The Washington Post, and Art Papers. His artwork is included in the collections of High Museum Atlanta, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Orlando Museum of Art, Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the Museum of Contemporary Photography Chicago.

photo courtesy Sean Scheidt

“I am very grateful for the Artist Travel Prize and thank the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts and the Municipal Art Society for their support,” said Larson. “It will empower me to work on “Centroid Towns,” a long-term social documentary project studying the cities that have been the mean center of population of the United States using photography, oral history interviews, and local archive research. The travel prize will fund fieldwork in two small towns in Indiana to examine the ways in which they have been affected by immigration and incarceration. The larger project puts a face to statistical data, chronicling these towns and their inhabitants to illuminate the ongoing social and political transformation of America.”

The Municipal Art Society of Baltimore was founded in 1899 as part of the City Beautiful movement. It is one of only two remaining societies to be operating under its original charter “to provide sculptural and pictorial decoration and ornaments for the public buildings, streets and open spaces in the City of Baltimore, and to help generally beautify the City.” Artistic contributions to the City span more than one hundred years. In 2016 the MASOB embarked on a path to provide new opportunities to Baltimore artists and art places within the City, including this Artist Travel Prize and an annual Public Art Prize.

DESIGNING THE PARKWAY 

Wed. Oct. 25, 2017 

SNF Parkway Theatre

5 W. North Ave. Baltimore

A conversation and behind-the-scenes look at the rebranding of the Maryland Film Festival and how Baltimore’s grandest movie theater was turned into a 21st-century landmark. 

With:

Ziger/Snead Architects

Post Typography

& Southway Builders

Moderated by Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson

Presented by AIA Baltimore and AIGA Baltimore as part of Design Month 2017

Sponsored by Indigo Ink

Happy hour at 5:30 PM

Event starts at 6:30 pm 

 

Students: free

AIA or AIGA members: $5

General public: $10

Advance tickets: http://www.aiabaltimore.org/events/designing-the-parkway/

The Parkway Theatre’s unique architecture and design approach celebrates the building’s 100 years of opulence, decay, and reinvention. The stunning transformation of this grand theater contrasts modern interventions with a century of history, resulting in a ‘rescued ruin’ where layers of the past coexist with the future.

Architects Ziger/Snead and designers Post Typography, along with Southway Builders share stories and the process behind the theater’s provocative design and the challenges of bringing this abandoned movie palace back to life as a year-round home for contemporary cinema. Explore one of Baltimore’s most unique architectural landmarks while enjoying a cocktail, craft beer, and some popcorn. 

 

 

Baltimore Office of Promotion and The Arts / City of Baltimore solicit proposals for the FY2018 National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Our Town grant program. Due date for proposals: September 1, 2017 

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Our Town grant program supports creative placemaking projects that help to transform communities into lively, beautiful, and resilient places with the arts at their core. Creative placemaking is when artists, arts organizations, and community development practitioners deliberately integrate arts and culture into community revitalization work ‐ placing arts at the table with land‐use, transportation, economic development, education, housing, infrastructure, and public safety strategies. This funding supports local efforts to enhance quality of life and opportunity for existing residents, increase creative activity, and create a distinct sense of place. 

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