Dollar General, Olney, Illinois, 2017

The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) and the Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City (MASOB) are happy to announce the recipient of the Municipal Art Society of Baltimore City Artist Travel Prize, Nate Larson. Selected from a highly competitive pool of applicants, Nate will use the $6,000 award to work on his project “Centroid Towns,” a long-term photographic project documenting towns that have been the mean center (meaning the geographical point that describes a centerpoint of a region’s population) of the United States. This travel grant will facilitate travel to two towns in Indiana to continue his work focusing on issues of immigration, incarceration and their relationship to national identity.

Currently based out of Baltimore, Maryland, Nate Larson is a contemporary artist working with photographic media, artist books and digital video. Most of his current artwork, research, and collaborations explore the linkage between human experience and the site on which it happened through technological, cultural, and historical threads.

His projects have been widely exhibited across the United States and internationally as well as featured in numerous publications and media outlets, including Wired, The Guardian, The Picture Show from NPR, Slate, CNN, Hyperallergic, Gizmodo, Buzzfeed News, Vice Magazine, the New York Times, Utne Reader, Hotshoe Magazine, Flavorwire, the BBC News Viewfinder, Frieze Magazine, the British Journal of Photography, APM’s Marketplace Tech Report, The Washington Post, and Art Papers. His artwork is included in the collections of High Museum Atlanta, Crystal Bridges Museum of American Art, the Orlando Museum of Art, Portland Art Museum, the Museum of Fine Arts Houston, and the Museum of Contemporary Photography Chicago.

photo courtesy Sean Scheidt

“I am very grateful for the Artist Travel Prize and thank the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts and the Municipal Art Society for their support,” said Larson. “It will empower me to work on “Centroid Towns,” a long-term social documentary project studying the cities that have been the mean center of population of the United States using photography, oral history interviews, and local archive research. The travel prize will fund fieldwork in two small towns in Indiana to examine the ways in which they have been affected by immigration and incarceration. The larger project puts a face to statistical data, chronicling these towns and their inhabitants to illuminate the ongoing social and political transformation of America.”

The Municipal Art Society of Baltimore was founded in 1899 as part of the City Beautiful movement. It is one of only two remaining societies to be operating under its original charter “to provide sculptural and pictorial decoration and ornaments for the public buildings, streets and open spaces in the City of Baltimore, and to help generally beautify the City.” Artistic contributions to the City span more than one hundred years. In 2016 the MASOB embarked on a path to provide new opportunities to Baltimore artists and art places within the City, including this Artist Travel Prize and an annual Public Art Prize.

DESIGNING THE PARKWAY 

Wed. Oct. 25, 2017 

SNF Parkway Theatre

5 W. North Ave. Baltimore

A conversation and behind-the-scenes look at the rebranding of the Maryland Film Festival and how Baltimore’s grandest movie theater was turned into a 21st-century landmark. 

With:

Ziger/Snead Architects

Post Typography

& Southway Builders

Moderated by Elizabeth Evitts Dickinson

Presented by AIA Baltimore and AIGA Baltimore as part of Design Month 2017

Sponsored by Indigo Ink

Happy hour at 5:30 PM

Event starts at 6:30 pm 

 

Students: free

AIA or AIGA members: $5

General public: $10

Advance tickets: http://www.aiabaltimore.org/events/designing-the-parkway/

The Parkway Theatre’s unique architecture and design approach celebrates the building’s 100 years of opulence, decay, and reinvention. The stunning transformation of this grand theater contrasts modern interventions with a century of history, resulting in a ‘rescued ruin’ where layers of the past coexist with the future.

Architects Ziger/Snead and designers Post Typography, along with Southway Builders share stories and the process behind the theater’s provocative design and the challenges of bringing this abandoned movie palace back to life as a year-round home for contemporary cinema. Explore one of Baltimore’s most unique architectural landmarks while enjoying a cocktail, craft beer, and some popcorn. 

 

 

Baltimore Office of Promotion and The Arts / City of Baltimore solicit proposals for the FY2018 National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Our Town grant program. Due date for proposals: September 1, 2017 

The National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) Our Town grant program supports creative placemaking projects that help to transform communities into lively, beautiful, and resilient places with the arts at their core. Creative placemaking is when artists, arts organizations, and community development practitioners deliberately integrate arts and culture into community revitalization work ‐ placing arts at the table with land‐use, transportation, economic development, education, housing, infrastructure, and public safety strategies. This funding supports local efforts to enhance quality of life and opportunity for existing residents, increase creative activity, and create a distinct sense of place. 

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Mayor Catherine E. Pugh and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts announce the recipients of the Creative Baltimore Fund.  More than 40 established organizations and individual artists will receive grants from $225,000 available in funding.  The Creative Baltimore Fund is administered by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts.

The Creative Baltimore Fund provides support to artists and organizations through two grants.  The Mayor’s Individual Artist Award provides project support of $5,000 for programs that promote public access and encourage the breadth of arts and/or cultural programming in the community.  Recipients of this year’s award are Bruce McKaig, Lola Pierson, Caitlin Carbone and Josh Thomas, James Carter and Julie Lin.  Descriptions of their proposed projects are listed below.

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The White House released its proposed budget to Congress today, officially recommending full termination of funding of both the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) and National Endowment for the Humanities (NEH) for FY2018. This is the first American President in history to propose zeroing out all funding for the nation’s federal cultural agencies.

Eliminating the NEA would be a devastating blow to the arts in America. For more than 50 years, the NEA has expanded access to the arts for all Americans, awarding grants in every Congressional district throughout all 50 states and U.S. Territories as well as placing arts therapists in 12 military hospitals to help returning soldiers heal from traumatic brain injuries. The NEA is also an economic powerhouse, generating more than $600 million annually in additional matching funds and helping to shape a $730 billion arts and culture industry that represents 4.2% of the nation’s GDP and supports 4.8 million jobs.

The federal appropriations process does not end here. We now begin a concerted grassroots effort to convince Congress to #SaveTheNEA. Here are the actions you can take right now:

  1. The most important thing you can do is to take two minutes to send a customizable message to your elected representatives in Congressand urge them to oppose any attempt to eliminate or cut funding to the NEA.
  2. Post on Facebookand Twitter to help rally national support to save the NEA. There is strength in numbers and your social media friends can help. 

We’ll be at Arts Advocacy Day next week, helping to ensure there is a strong voice in support of the arts. In the meantime, make sure to watch our social media accounts to stay up to date on the latest news. Find us on Facebook. Find us on Twitter
Thank You,

Baltimore Office Of Promotion and The Arts

(image credit: The Thoughts In My Head by Megan Lewis, detail)

Art @ Work is a five-week mural artist apprenticeship program for Baltimore City youth enrolled in the city’s YouthWorks program. Dozens of young people ages 14-21 are hired each summer to work side by side with professional artists to create highly visible murals and mosaics throughout their neighborhood.

The goal of Art @ Work is to introduce youth to career opportunities in the arts, offer gainful employment in a positive learning environment and to provide youth with the tools to express themselves through the arts, all while beautifying their community. Since its launch in 2015, Art @ Work has produced 19 indoor and outdoor public art projects in the Sandtown and Upton communities, employing over 150 Baltimore City youth.

ART @ WORK IS HIRING!

The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts, Jubilee Arts, and 901 Arts seek artists, artist interns, and teen apprentices for the 2017 Art @ Work program. Apply today!

Photo by Nate Larson

LOOKING FOR A SUMMER JOB? | ARE YOU 14-21 YEARS OLD? | INTERESTED IN PAINTING MURALS?
Jubilee Arts, 901 Arts, and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts are hiring motivated and hardworking young leaders with an interest in painting and drawing to create murals and mosaics this summer for the Art @ Work artist apprenticeship program. Learn how you can be a part of the art! Parents are encouraged to attend.

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