Application Deadline: Friday, October, 6, 2017 at midnight

Maryland Art Place (MAP) is excited to restore the Curators’ Incubator program, slated to open May of 2018. MAP established Curators’ Incubator in 2004 as a platform for aspiring curators to grow. In this program, MAP’s gallery is made available to an emerging curator or curatorial team to develop a creative, curatorial vision as part of a 9-month mentored partnership initiative. The program provides approximately 2,200 square feet of gallery space in downtown Baltimore, located within the Bromo Arts District.

MAP is open to exhibition proposals of all types. Curators’ proposals will be juried by MAP’s staff and Programming Advisory Committee (PAC) this October, 2017. After the initial review of proposals, up to five curators will be selected for advancement to phase two of the application process where they will be required to formally present and expand upon their proposal to the PAC in November.

Proposal Must Contain:
Online application form
Statement of intent
Short biography for each artist intended for inclusion in proposed exhibition
Comprehensive Budget (see prospectus for details)

To view the full prospectus click here!
To download the application, click here!

October 6, 2017: Complete Proposals Due
November 2017: Select Proposal Presentations
December 2017: Curators Announced
May 17, 2018: Curators Incubator Exhibition Opening

Questions? Email MAP’s Program Manager, Naomi, Naomi@mdartplace.org!

A program that builds on your unique strengths.

The Bunting Neighborhood Leadership Program (BNLP) is a one-of-a-kind initiative led by the Johns Hopkins Urban Health Institute.  We recognize that Baltimore neighborhoods have a wealth of community members with passion, leadership, and vision who know their communities best – and are therefore well positioned to address community problems.  However, there are limited resources available at the neighborhood level for leadership training. To address this issue and support emerging leaders, the BNLP will cultivate and train neighborhood-level and community-based leaders to build with them the knowledge, skills, and mentorship to improve neighborhood health outcomes.

 Bunting Neighborhood Leadership Program

Goals

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The Spartanburg Art Museum seeking proposals for solo and group exhibitions for 2018 and 2019!

We’re interested in all types of work that address contemporary issues and concerns, use traditional materials in unusual ways, and elevate our visitors’ experiences to new levels of participation and engagement.

Any individual, collective, or group of artists located regionally, nationally, or internationally (ages 18+) may apply. All mediums and themes will be considered for exhibition.

APPLICATION FEE: $35 US

APPLICATION DEADLINE: SEPTEMBER 30 2017

Click the link below to pay the application fee. Once your payment has been processed, a download link will appear on the “Thank You” page. You will also receive a confirmation email with a download link to access the application form. This download link will be valid for 30 days or until September 30, 2017 (whichever comes first.)

REQUIRED MATERIALS:

  • 8-10 digital images or CD of artwork

  • artist statement

  • short biography

  • resume and/or CV

  • official application form (located in the document below)

  • $35 USD application fee

For more information, contact our Exhibitions Coordinator + Designer, Ashleigh Shuler at 864.582.7616 x 254 or email apayne@spartanarts.org.

WHAT: Now Be Here #4, DMV (DC/MD/VA)
Female and female-identifying artists are frequently overlooked in the art world—just 30% of artists represented by commercial galleries are women, and women artists only have about 25% of the solo shows at major museums. In partnership with Los Angeles-based artist Kim Schoenstadt, the Now Be Here project comes to the National Museum of Women in the Arts (NMWA) in Washington, D.C., for its fourth and final U.S. iteration.

Now Be Here #4, DMV will gather female and female-identifying visual artists for a group photograph of historic proportions. Previous Now Be Here gatherings have taken place in Los Angeles, New York City and Miami where, collectively, more than 2,000 women artists participated. Co-organized by D.C.-based artist Linn Meyers, this version will also feature a cocktail hour and an artist resource fair with representatives from numerous arts organizations in the DMV. In addition, Now Let’s Talk, a dynamic schedule of talks, lectures and panel discussions, will bring museums and organizations across the region together to highlight female artists and discuss issues of women in the arts.

The project website will list the artists in attendance so every artist is identified.

Invitations to local artists will be sent out in September. If you are with the media and interested in covering the event, please contact smeteer@nmwa.org to be added to the press list.

WHEN:
Wed., October 25, 2017, 6:30 p.m.

PRICE:
Free. Pre-registration for artists is required. Invitations will be sent in September.

Now Be Here #4, DMV is a free, event for female and female-identifying artists. If you would like an invitation please e-mail: freshtalk@nmwa.org.

Tectonic Space is accepting submissions for their upcoming show, What May Be, focusing on futuristic visions.

One of the most powerful elements of science fiction and fantasy mediums is their ability to depict worlds that challenge our views and what we are familiar with. They can depict worlds not bound to our norms or expectations. These genres can offer warnings or promises, predicting possible darker or brighter futures, and imagine the societal, environmental, and political impacts of our current actions.

This show is open to all mediums reflecting the above theme.

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The removal of Baltimore’s Confederate monuments has captured the attention of the public and inspired artists and others to propose ideas for what might happen next at the four sites left behind. In response, the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts has created an online portal, “Monumental Sites,” to serve as a central repository for the public’s suggestions and ideas. Take a look at the Monumental Sites section on our Public Art page for more information: http://bit.ly/BOPAPublicArt

     1. Where are you from originally?

Baltimore, Maryland. I’m a local Northeast Baltimorean. I went to college in High Point, North Carolina to follow my passion for Interior Design, but realized it was a little difficult to find employment with local Interior Design firms in my hometown.  I then transferred up here to Baltimore, graduating from Sojourner-Douglass College with a BA in Business Administration and then received my Master’s in Public Administration specializing in nonprofit management from the University of Baltimore.  I’ve been in the nonprofit sector for about 18 + years and have experience in fundraising/revenue development, strategic planning, training/development, budget administration and marketing and relationship management.

 

  1. What are some of the things you’re responsible for as Assistant Development Director?

My role was a newly created position to provide support to the Director of Development as she is out in the field raising funds. I’m responsible for overseeing the day-to-day operations of the Development department. We have a team of seven people, and I’m responsible for making sure the team strategizes in regards to raising funds through foundation, government, and city partners, corporate sponsors and individual donors.  In addition, my role requires me to work closely with our finance department to reconcile cash receipts, pledges and provide accurate reports to close out the month. 

 

  1. Where were you before BOPA?

Before BOPA I served as the Associate Director of Development at House of Ruth Maryland for about two years.  Prior to the House of Ruth Maryland, I worked for the United Way of Central Maryland.  Throughout my nonprofit experience I fundraised for human services, but now I’m fundraising for the arts, which is so much more relaxing and fun!

 

  1. How is that different?

Human services can focus on prevention as well as remediation of problems or specific needs.  During my time at the House of Ruth Maryland I fundraised for women and children who were involved in intimate partner violence. As a survivor I wanted to work closely with an organization that I am very passionate about which allowed me to educate individuals on domestic violence. Prior to that I worked for United Way of Central Maryland and our goal was to fight poverty in central Maryland with programs encouraging self-sufficiency. I guided various state and city agencies in their fundraising efforts for the workplace giving campaigns. We were really trying to engage individuals to give back to the community. That was a good and challenging experience for me because it is hard to get people to give through back especially if they felt underpaid.  Employees had specific nonprofit organizations that they supported, but the good thing about the United Way campaign it allowed an individual to pick up to five charities to give to at the end of the year and have it deducted from their paycheck. Coming to BOPA, because I’m a Baltimore City resident, I really wanted to help beautify the city, through the murals, the art and the cultural programs that we have in the city. I’ve always been a very strong advocate and participant in all of the festivals and events, but I didn’t have a clue as to what took place behind the scenes here at BOPA. Now I have such huge respect and admiration because I didn’t realize all the small, intricate details that took place.

  1. Is this the career path you pictured for yourself?

No, I actually studied interior decorating, but when I transferred back I had to find a job to put me through school so I started working in the undergraduate admissions department at Johns Hopkins University.  I worked there for a total of 8 years at Hopkins, which in my last 4 years I worked in the graduate admissions department enrolling students.  During my time on the campus I decided to help the Black Student Union with one of their events. They needed someone to help them raise money and I found my niche in fundraising.  I had the relationships with local businesses and I knew wealthy individuals. Eventually I just stepped out on faith and left Johns Hopkins University. I found a job at the American Red Cross fundraising for Anne Arundel County. I traveled around the United States for national disasters and on occasions I was gone for a month on more depending on the disaster.  I actually left the organization right before Katrina, but I was working for the American Red Cross when 9/11 hit. It was really easy to fundraise for the American Red Cross because whenever you have a natural disaster like that, everyone is opening up their wallets. 

 

  1. What are some of the most challenging parts of raising money for BOPA’s programs? What goals does BOPA have for fundraising annually?

The challenging part is trying to get donors and sponsors to understand our mission and our goal in raising funds, simply because people think of us as a city agency when we are a 501 (c) (3) nonprofit organization. We are currently fundraising a little differently now that we have a new team. We are packaging BOPA as a whole and sharing with our partners everything that we do in regards to events, festivals and cultural programs. We want to make sure each partner understands our need and they are matched up with proper events and programs that aligned with their mission. The development department is responsible for raising 10 million dollars annually.

 

  1. What are some of your favorite parts of your job?

I just love the BOPA team. We are very family oriented and very close knit. I love the fact that everyone rolls up their sleeves and gets the work done; we are all hands on deck. You don’t find that in too many organizations. Also, fundraising for BOPA has been so rewarding because I’m actually going out and telling sponsors and donors what it is that BOPA does as a whole because people really don’t have a clue. They think of us as a city agency and we’re trying to change that mentality.

 

  1. What do you hope to see BOPA accomplish in the next 5 years?

Creating a strategic plan for our department, because when I came on board the development department did not have a strategic plan. So my goal ultimately is within the next 3 years to have a strategic plan for development department.

 

  1. Do you think BOPA will continue to grow?

Oh yeah, definitely. We really have set the bar with Light City Baltimore. Light City showed Baltimore City and BOPA’s potential to generate revenue and increase partnerships nationally and internationally.  I think with the new administration under Mayor Catherine Pugh’s leadership she will keep BOPA in the forefront since she is such a strong advocate for the arts and culture.