Matthew Moore, Desert Shores, CA (detail), 2016, Collection of the Artist

Photographic artists of all walks are invited to submit their latest works to a new national juried show at the Academy Art Museum in Easton, MD. The exhibition aims to highlight the current state of photography across a broad spectrum. Artists may submit all types of photographic works including digital, analog, alternative processes, etc.


Juror

Sarah Stolfa, Chief Executive Officer and Artistic Director of the Philadelphia Photo Art Center. Sarah Stolfa is a working fine-art photographer and educator with over eight years of experience in photography, education, curatorial work and digital lab creation and management. She has an MFA in Photography from Yale University School of Art. In addition to teaching at PPAC, Stolfa has taught at the Yale University Art Gallery, the Whitney Museum of American Art, the University of Delaware and Drexel University. She currently teaches at the University of Pennsylvania.


Awards

Best in Show $1,000, Second Prize $500, Third Prize $250

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Raising Hands and Voices is a collaborative exhibition organized by students and faculty at the Community College of Baltimore County (CCBC) and the Maryland Institute College of Art. The exhibition, which is planned to coincide with the fourth annual CCBC Africana Studies Independent Film Festival, will include artwork addressing the themes of racial profiling, police violence, and tension between the police and the Baltimore community. These issues are explored in the film Profiled, which will be featured in this year’s film festival. The purpose of the Raising Hands and Voices exhibition is to increase awareness of systematic inequalities in policing that affect communities of color while bringing the experiences of victims of police violence, who are often unacknowledged, from the margin to the center. More information about the CCBC Africana Studies Film Festival is available from http://www.africanastudiesfilmfestival.org/

Columbia Festival of the Arts is returning to the Columbia Lakefront in Maryland in June 2018 for a spectacular celebration. The juried, Invitational Fine Arts & Crafts Show is currently seeking artisans with original work, representing a breadth of media including functional and wearable art to participate in this June 15-17, 2018, free outdoor weekend.

Show Dates & Times: Friday, June 15, 5 – 8 p.m., Saturday, June 16, Noon – 8 p.m., & Sunday, June 17, Noon – 7 p.m. 

DEADLINE: March 5th, 2018

For more information and to apply, click here. 

Artscape, America’s largest free arts festival, invites artists, exhibitors, vendors and organizations to apply to participate in the 2018 festival taking place Friday, July 20 through Sunday, July 22, 2018. The Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts is now accepting proposals from artists for Artwork Projects and applications for the Artist-Run Art Fair, Food Vendors, The Fred Lazarus IV Artscape Prize (“The Fred”), Gamescape, Kidscape, LOL@Artscape, Non-Profit and Arts/Cultural Organizations, and Performing Arts (opera, theatre, dance, classical music, street theater, etc.)  In recent years, Artscape organizers have applied an overarching theme, relevant to both the arts and Baltimore City, into the festival’s creative thinking. For 2018, the festival is going back to the basics…ART. For “the year we didn’t have a theme,” artists and festival-goers are encouraged to embrace Artscape for what it is – a fully accessible, 100% FREE, world-class arts festival – right here in the heart of Baltimore City. New for 2018: Artscape is proud to shine a light on the creative and artistic talent of Baltimore’s youth, with plans to showcase youth-focused programming (in both the visual and performing arts) on Artscape’s opening day, Friday, July 20, 2018. 

Deadline: February 28, 2018

For more information, click here

Deadline to submit: February 16, 2018

Exhibition dates: December 15 2018February 9, 2018

Greater Reston Arts Center (GRACE) invites artists to submit a proposal for new artwork in response to the prompt, “If you could do anything, what would that be?”

Five artists will be selected by Guest Curator Don Rossell and GRACE Associate Curator Erica Harriosn to participate in the 2018 Mary B. Howard Invitational: STRETCH. The exhibition is named in memory of Mary B. Howard, an artist, longitme board member, and staunch supporter of the Greater Reston Arts Center. Selected artists will receive a $250 honorarium and $1000 for materials.

A written proposal of work in response to the prompt, “if you could do anything what would that be?” (500 words max.), Artist statement (250 words max.), CV or resume, Ten (10) images of past work.

For more information, click here

  1. Tell me a little bit about your background? When did you begin working for BOPA?
    I began in 1985 as an event coordinator for the Baltimore Office of Promotion and Tourism.  I oversaw the Baltimore Farmers’ Market, Kid’s Stuff Program, July 4th & New Year’s Eve fireworks, and worked on the Preakness and Thanksgiving Parades. I left briefly to go to the Baltimore Convention Center where I worked as an account executive, then I returned to BOP (Baltimore Office of Promotion) in 1989 as the Assistant Promotions Director. We didn’t become BOPA until 2001 when we merged with the Mayor’s Advisory Committee on Art and Culture (MACAC). My role progressed to Director of Promotions, to Deputy Director, then Chief Operating Officer, and now interim CEO.

  2. What does a typical day look like for you? Actually, my days vary and are multi-faceted. They are most often a mixture of pressing matters that need immediate attention and action, combined with items that require long range planning. I usually have a full schedule of meetings in and out of the office. So in many ways, my typical day is not typical. I also get a lot of calls from people outside the office who want to do an event and need help finding a contact or seeking information on logistics.

  3. How has your role changed since assuming the position of Interim CEO?
    My role has changed significantly. In addition to serving as Interim CEO, I am overseeing finance during this interim period. Also, as Interim CEO, I interface more with City Hall by attending cabinet meetings and regular touch-base meetings with the Mayor’s Office.

  4. What are some of the biggest challenges you’ve dealt with since becoming Interim CEO?
    I think the biggest and most exciting challenge right now is keeping the momentum going at an effective, productive and creative level. BOPA never has a slow time of year, so solid organization is key. During this period, Festivals Director Kathy Hornig, who has now become interim COO, has been doing an excellent job tracking and organizing all the current issues that need to be addressed.  Kathy, Chief of External Affairs Donna Drew Sawyer and I meet on a weekly basis to go over any pressing issues. I find this helpful to keep everyone in the loop, get answers quickly, and maintain steady lines of communication. This is vital because, as you know, we move at a very fast pace here. In addition, we have stepped up our meetings with the department directors, which used to be monthly, to occur bi-weekly. Most importantly, we are very fortunate to have such strong, committed and creative staff here at BOPA to help meet our goals.

  5. What is the most rewarding thing to you about your job?
    I find it very rewarding to see the tremendous positive impact our events and programs have on the Baltimore community, both on the arts community and the community at large. Sometimes, we ourselves take it for granted, because when it’s your job, you don’t always stand back and look at the positives, but when you see the media coverage and the economic impact, you realize what a big deal it is. Our reach now, especially with Light City, is becoming more national. We’re getting even more international artists and I hear that in the international light artist world, people are talking about Baltimore. Through our grants, arts programs and festivals, and facilities, we are able to enhance the Baltimore experience and produce good news for our city. It’s good to work at a place where you’re always planning positive and meaningful programs that affect the community and in fact, make people want to come to Baltimore and live here. You can’t do that everywhere.

  6. What are your hopes for BOPA’s future in the next five years? My hope for BOPA in the next five years is that we can continue to do the good work that we do, that we build on our successes and reinforce the BOPA brand. For so many years we’ve done these large events and didn’t say that they were produced by the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts. Not everyone knows about BOPA and we haven’t always been good about putting ourselves out there. Now, we realize how important that is that people understand the BOPA brand. It’s also important that sponsors understand we are a nonprofit when we’re going out to raise money, so we can keep our events free and open to the public. I would like to grow our events and programs to include an even larger audience on a national scale, to expand our reach to more national sponsors, and to provide more employment opportunities for Baltimoreans. We employ a lot of Baltimore artists, as you know, and a lot of people through our events, so I would like to expand that.

  7. Anything else you’d like to add?
    My answer, if someone asked me why I wanted to work here, would be that you just can’t do this kind of thing anywhere else. It’s very rare that you can work somewhere where you’re doing arts programming, annual events, running facilities, helping to plan a Super Bowl parade or a Fan Fest for the World Series. It’s very unique, and always changing.