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The City of Baltimore and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts (BOPA) in collaboration with the Baltimore City Department of Transportation (DOT) are seeking a qualified artist or team to create a new design and style guide for the City’s gateway signage. The deadline is August 21st, 2015. Click through for full information and the link to the application form.

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The City of Baltimore, the Baltimore Public Art Commission, and the Baltimore Office of Promotion & The Arts in collaboration with the Baltimore City Department of General Services and St Vincent de Paul is seeking to commission a professional artist or artist team to create artwork for permanent display as part of Sarah’s Hope. The deadline is August 7th, 2015. Click through for more information and for the link to the submission form.

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This past Friday, June 19th, I was lucky enough to visit Jonathan Latiano’s studio and interview him briefly about himself and his current projects. His work space is located in School 33 Art Center, just upstairs from one of School 33’s current exhibitions that Jonathan is participating in, the Studio Artist Biennial. Jonathan was very generous with his time and we discussed a multitude of topics surrounding his interests, the themes in his work, and his ongoing projects. Click through to see photos of Jonathan’s studio and read about our conversation.

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Last month, BOPA teamed up with the Baltimore Office of Sustainability to bring together farmers, artists, and community residents for a charette designed to help us shape our latest public art initiative. Together, we’re developing an unprecedented program that will provide microgrants for temporary public art works on and around hoop houses sited on city-owned vacant property.

Overall, we’re excited about the positive response we got and are grateful for the enthusiastic participants who contributed to our charette. We’re taking all the feedback we received and using it to generate an RFP (Request for Proposals) which we will release later this year.

Here’s a quick recap of the charette in case you missed it:

We started off with a tour of Gather Baltimore‘s hoop house in Oliver. Growing Green Coordinator, Jenny Guillaume, led the group into the plastic tunnel Gather’s farmers use to extend their growing season. It was warm inside despite the freezing temperatures outside the hoop house doors.

Like most hoop houses, Gather’s is made of polythylene film and bent steel sturdy enough for one of the farmers in attendance to show off his pull ups. The sidewalls are removable and the poly can be rolled up to lower the inside temperature and improve airflow during the hot summer months. In addition to wall modifications, shadecloths can also be draped over the structure to lower temperatures, and “cooling paint” can be applied directly to the poly. This particular hoop house was fully sprinklered and, though it had a streetlight nearby, it had no electricity.

After our quick tour, we went back inside for a group discussion, which we broke up into two sections – “Hoop Dreams” and “Hoop Realities”.

HOOP DREAMS –
We asked: What do you want to see? 

  • Solar-powered lighting, ambient lighting, and in-frame lighting
  • Seasonal decorations / installations
  • Community involvement!
  • Painted-screen style shadecloths
  • Frame painting
  • Colored poly
  • Artistic water gathering/recycling features
  • Other functional artistic features such as: bird houses, trellis, materials that encourage habitats for bees
  • Designed space for farmers to interface with residents
  • Designed space for farmers to process
  • Activating the hoop house during the off season (December-February)

HOOP REALITIES –
We asked: What kind of design constraints do you foresee?

  • Hoop houses are largely unmonitored when they aren’t being worked in so any equipment (eg. expensive lights or projectors) would not necessarily be secured
  • Some community residents don’t find hoop houses attractive, especially in the winter months, and would prefer that they be set back in lots rather than on main thoroughfares
  • March-November are the busy farming months. December-February are dormant.
  • Planting beds should not be tread on
  • Hoop houses rarely have power sources
  • Water control is often needed to prevent flooding
  • Communities want the food grown inside local hoophouses to be made available to the community

After our discussion, we broke out into groups. Equipped with colored pencils, we all began to draw out our concepts. Some hoop houses turned into caterpillars.  Some turned into castles and living rooms. Others still were retrofitted with wire sculptures, puppets, and sculptural vegetation on designed trellis.

I think it’s safe to say that the possibilities are pretty much endless when it comes to what you can do to infuse artwork into local hoop houses. Stay tuned for the release of our micro-granting program later this spring!

The Maryland-National Capital Park and Planning Commission, Prince George’s Department of Parks and Recreation invites individual artists and artist teams with interest in and/or professional experience in creating public art and site specific commissions, to submit proposals for the William Beanes Community Center. Project 1 will consist of an exterior artwork on the facade of the facility adjacent to the main entrance. Project 2 will consist of an interior artwork located on the wall above the control desk near the main entrance.

Artists and artist teams may apply for both, but no one artist or artist team will be awarded both commissions. The selected artist/team will design, fabricate, and install a work of art in the form of a painted mural, metal, mosaic or glass installation for the interior; and a metal, mosaic or glass installation for the exterior.

The project budget, including materials, fabrication, installation, travel and expenses, is $50,000.00 for Project 1 and $15,000.00 for Project 2.

PROPOSALS AND QUALIFICATIONS CAN BE SUBMITTED TO THE MARYLAND-NATIONAL CAPITAL PARK AND PLANNING COMMISSION AT:

Attention: William Beanes Public Art
Arts & Cultural Heritage Division
7833 Walker Drive, Suite 430
Greenbelt, MD 20770

UNTIL 5:00 P.M. EST ON MARCH 27, 2015.

Congratulations to community artist Iandry Randriamondroso on the successful completion of his B’MORE Birds project!

Over the course of the last several months, Iandry has worked closely with residents of the communities along the York Road corridor between Glenwood and 43rd street to create a series of five murals depicting native birds of the Govans forest patches. Last Friday, BOPA joined corridor residents, York Road Partnership, Govanstowne Business Association, Loyola York Road Initiative, Councilman Bill Henry and the Department of Transportation in celebrating Iandry’s work.

York Rd Mural Celebraition 002 York Rd Mural Celebraition 004 York Rd Mural Celebraition 018

ABOUT THE BIRDS

Rileys Beauty

The Oriole

4331 York Road

Baltimore Orioles are bright orange birds with black and white wings that sound almost as beautiful as they look. Their smooth, whistling songs are commonly heard in orchards, backyards, and gardens. Baltimore Orioles mostly eat insects and fruit, such as raspberries and mulberries. Their sturdy, hammock-like nests are suspended from branches high in trees, woven together with grasses, hair, spider webs, twine, and wool.

Gomez Tires 2

The Cedar Waxwing

4811 York Road

Cedar Waxwings are bold colored birds with rusty brown bodies, black face masks, and orange or yellow wax-tipped tails. They are often found in flocks, filling themselves with berries from a variety of plants, such as mulberry trees and honeysuckle shrubs. They are common in residential areas, staying in Maryland all year round.

Afrik Salon

The Red-bellied Woodpecker

5017 York Road

Red-bellied Woodpeckers are common woodpeckers found in wooded areas that have a red cap, black wings, and a warm beige belly. Their large black bill is used for drilling into dead wood to pull out insects and larvae with their barbed tongues. They also drill cavities inside dead trees to lay 2-6 eggs and raise their young over a month-long period.

Academy Cleaners - South Wall

The Blue Jay

5219 York Road

Blue Jays are the local noisy neighbors in wooded residential areas, with their loud jaaaaay calls that easily distinguish them. They are pale to bright blue and white birds that eat a variety of insects, nuts, and seeds. They also sometimes eat eggs from other birds’ nests and are aggressive at the local bird feeder. Blue Jay eggs are blue to light brown, within nests placed approximately 20 feet above ground in trees.

York Rd Mural Celebraition 016

The Black-and-White Warbler

5219 York Road

Black-and-white Warblers are small, black and white striped birds that live in forests. Often seen creeping along tree branches, they eat a variety of insect larvae hidden in the wood, along with ants and beetles. They spend the winter months in Mexico and migrate up to Maryland to breed in the summer, building well-hidden nests on the ground near tree trunks.

This project was made possible by funding from the Baltimore City Department of Transportation as part of Baltimore’s 1% for Public Art Program