Call for Proposals: Themed Exhibition Series “Self”

The Department of Visual and Performing Arts is calling for exhibition proposals for the Open Gallery in The Morris and Gwendolyn Cafritz Foundation Arts Center that address the theme, “Self.”
Four exhibitions will be scheduled for the 2019-2020 academic year. For the 2019-2020 season, we are seeking artists who explore contemporary ideas of Self Portraiture; engaging with the self through either representational or conceptual means.

The deadline for “Self” proposals is March 15, 2019 at 11:59 p.m.

Gallery floor plan | Prospectus |  Go to Application ]

If you have questions about these calls for proposals, please contact Katherine Knight, katherine.knight@montgomerycollege.edu.

Call for Artists: https://cms.montgomerycollege.edu/arts-tpss/exhibitions/opportunities.html

Homegrown Tenor Sings Puccini at Peabody, by Matt Ward

Baltimore native Daniel Sampson drinks a lot of water.

“So far today, it’s before noon and I’ve already drank more than half a gallon,” Sampson said, laughing, in a recent interview.

Sampson, 26, is a singer—a tenor—so, he has to take care of his voice day in and day out. Right now, he’s a section head in the choir at Zion Church of the City of Baltimore (near City Hall), he’s getting ready to play the role of Rinuccio in Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi, and he’s pursuing a master’s in voice at Peabody Conservatory. It sounds like an intense program, but Sampson comes across as a calm, upbeat, even-keeled. For his instrument to work its best, he says, he has to be.

image courtesy of Edward S. Davis

“For me, the two keys are hydration and relaxation,” Sampson says. “I try to make sure that I feel good, and then I just try to relax and not get too worked up about things.” Recalling a recent conversation with a Peabody classmate, he adds: “If things are going really bad for him, he can put his clarinet down and walk away for a few hours and come back to it. For me, I live with my voice. It’s also just a lot of love an acceptance, too. You have to accept: this is where I am, this is where I am today. But that’s what technique is for, too, to make sure your voice is pretty dependable.”

Sampson is working to hone that technique with husband and wife team Stanley Cornett (voice teacher) and Eileen Cornett (opera coach). “The way the conservatory is set up,” Sampson explains, “is you spend a lot of one-on-one time with your teachers and your coaches. You find a problem and they give you ideas how to fix it, then you come back hopefully better the next day than you were the one before.”

Asked whether the small campus at Mt. Vernon ever starts to feel like a fishbowl, populated as it is with high caliber musicians who inevitably have to compete for positions, Sampson explains his antidote: he lives in Federal Hill—so, at the end of the day, he is able to separate himself a bit. On campus, though, he tries to be happy for the successes of his classmates, and hopes they’ll return that vibe when he does well. “The environment is very collegial here,” he explains. “That doesn’t mean that it’s not intense. You’re being pushed to do things that you’ve never done before, you’re being pushed to be at the highest level that you can possibly be. For me, I’m not competing against anyone else here—I am bettering myself.”

Sampson grew up in the Baltimore neighborhood of Hunting Ridge, not far from the city/county line in Catonsville. His parents, both lawyers, did not play music, but some uncles did. His earliest musical memory is of listening to the choir at Morning Star Baptist Church. “I didn’t necessarily participate in the music ministry,” Sampson says. “I just watched.” In high school at Loyola Blakefield, he sung in the choir and performed in musicals. He got his bachelor’s in music education and voice from Loyola University New Orleans; then, after graduating, he stayed in New Orleans, teaching music at a Catholic School before taking a job as music director at church. When he decided he wanted to go to grad school for voice, he applied to Peabody. Coming back home to Baltimore, Sampson says, was important.

“It helps that my family’s here,” he says. “I lived in New Orleans for seven years, and I had to plan out for a very long time when I was going to see my family. And now if I want to go home for dinner at my parents’ house, I can just get in my car and be there in 20 minutes.”

Long term, Sampson sees himself teaching at the university level. But, he likes performing, too. So far, he’s been Monostatos in The Magic Flute and Lamar in Godspell; he’s been a soloist in Vivaldi’s Magnificat and Leonard Bernstein’s Mass. When we spoke for this article, he was getting ready for a nine-hour rehearsal ahead of his appearance next weekend in the Puccini opera at Peabody.

“We’ve been prepping for this for quite a while,” Sampson says. “I’ve been looking at this role on an off since at least the summertime. Now that I know it really well, it’s all about making sure that everything lines up with the voice. It’s really about endurance.”

Peabody Conservatory’s production of the three-part Puccini opera, Il Trittico, will take place Thursday through Sunday, March 7 through 10. Admission is free.

 
Maryland Arts Summit – Call for Proposals
 
Call for Proposals will be accepted through February 15, 2019 at 5PM. 
You will be notified of the status of your proposal by March 15, 2019. 
 
Accepted presenters will be offered free Summit registration and an honorarium. 
 
Pending acceptance, presenters will be expected to attend an Orientation Meeting for the Summit (in-person or conference call) in mid-April, and submit their space requirements as well as max attendance. 
 
Submitted Call for Proposals will be reviewed by the Summit Committee, comprised of Staff and Board members of the presenting organizations as well as community members and key stakeholders. 
 
Assessment Criteria includes (1) Alignment of session with Summit topic(s); and (2) Experience of presenter with selected conference topic(s).
Call Description:

The Delaplaine Arts Center, 40 South Carroll St, in historic downtown Frederick, Maryland, announces the 2019 National Juried Exhibit. All media are eligible, including but not limited to: painting, printmaking, photography, ceramics, drawing and sculpture.

Exhibit dates: May 4 – June 16, 2019

Awards: First place $1,000; Second Place $500; Third Place $250; HM $125

About the juror: 
Sandy Guttman is Curatorial Assistant at the Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden in Washington, DC. She has worked with Aspect/Ratio Projects, Bodies of Work, and Gallery 400. She is a founding editor of the arts and culture publication FWD: Museums. 

Entry Instructions: Visit http://delaplaine.org/exhibits/nje-2019/ for more information and to submit artwork for consideration. 

Fee: $35 per artist for up to three (3) images ($25 if artist is a current member of the Delaplaine). VISA, Mastercard, Discover and American Express are accepted.

Number of Pieces: Artists may submit up to 3 pieces (in JPEG format) for consideration. One digital image of each entire piece is required; for three dimensional works up to two detail images per piece are allowed (with a maximum of 9 images per proposal).

Images Specifications:
 Must be in JPEG format (500 MB max).

Deadline for entries: Monday, March 25, 2018 11:59 PM

Posting of Accepted work: April 15 no later than 5PM on our website at http://delaplaine.org/exhibits/nje-2019/

Request for Proposals: Greektown Public Art Installation

Issue Date: October 30th, 2018

Submission Deadline: December 30th, 2018

Request To: Greater Baltimore Sculpture Artists

The Greater Greektown Neighborhood Alliance (GGNA), on behalf of Greektown residents, requests proposals from sculpture artists for a public sculpture to be installed at the intersection of Eastern Avenue and South Lehigh Street, in Baltimore, MD. This project is a continuation of the Association’s efforts to beautify the community of Greektown and is driven by a group of community members who hope to transform this barren median into a true neighborhood gateway. The purpose of this RFP is to select an artist to implement a two-phase approach to creating the public sculpture. The first phase includes community engagement to determine themes relevant to neighbors and capture resident input. The second phase includes the design, fabrication, and installation of the sculpture, with assistance from GGNA and the Southeast Community Development Corporation (Southeast CDC), pending final review by the Baltimore City Department of Transportation (DOT).

Application details here: GGNA RFP 2 Updated

Congrats to Cindy Cheng and Elliot Doughtie from Baltimore for each receiving a $25,000 Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors Grant!

More information below:

The Joan Mitchell Foundation is pleased to announce the 2018 recipients of our annual Painters & Sculptors Grants, which provide 25 artists with $25,000 each in unrestricted funds. The recipients are: 

Felipe Baeza, Brooklyn, NY
Cindy Cheng, Baltimore, MD
Yanira Collado, North Miami, FL
Elisabeth Condon, New York, NY
David Antonio Cruz, Brooklyn, NY
Elliot Doughtie, Baltimore, MD
Addoley Dzegede, Portland, OR
Krista Franklin, Chicago, IL
Doreen Garner, Brooklyn, NY
EJ Hill, Los Angeles, CA
Lisa Jarrett, Portland, OR
Elizabeth Malaska, Portland, OR
Joiri Minaya, Bronx, NY
Maia Cruz Palileo, Brooklyn, NY
Wendy Red Star, Portland, OR
Naomi Reis, Brooklyn, NY
Jamea Richmond-Edwards, Silver Spring, MD
Kenny Rivero, New York, NY
Lauren Roche, Minneapolis, MN
Evelyn Rydz, Boston, MA
Blair Saxon-Hill, Portland, OR
Nyugen E. Smith, Jersey City, NJ
Juana Valdes, Miami, FL and Amherst, MA
Jose Villalobos, San Antonio, TX
Brittney Leeanne Williams, Chicago, IL

The unrestricted nature of the grants aligns with artist Joan Mitchell’s recognition that having the time and freedom to create is as important to the development of one’s practice as support for specific endeavors. As such, the Foundation, whose mission was set forth in Mitchell’s will, remains committed to providing artists with the flexibility to determine how best to use the grants to advance their careers. In addition to the financial support, recipients of the Painters & Sculptors Grants become eligible to apply for residencies at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans and gain access to a network of arts professionals, who can provide consultations on career development and financial management.

To be eligible for a grant, artists are nominated by artist peers and arts professionals selected from throughout the US, and are then chosen through an anonymous multi-phase jurying process. Over the last several years, the Foundation has increased its attention to equity and access in the selection process, expanding the pool of nominators and jurors to include more geographic, ethnic, and experiential diversity and ensure that the nominees reflect a spectrum of backgrounds and approaches to their work. Among this year’s class of Painters & Sculptors grantees, more than 70% of the grantees identify as female and approximately 80% as non-white, with those identifying as Black, African, African-American, and Caribbean comprising 36% of that number and Hispanic, Latinx, and Chicanx individuals 20%. The artists also range in age from 28 to 59 and hail from 10 states across the US.

The grant recipients’ work represents a wide range of artistic techniques, approaches, and concerns, and engages with such pressing issues as migration, identity, notions of belonging, and representation within the art historical canon and in social and political spheres, among other important subjects. The final selections for the grants are made with a particular eye toward artists whose work has contributed to important artistic and cultural discourse, but who have nonetheless remained under-recognized on a national level.

“Joan Mitchell recognized the essential need to support artists in the process of creating. We at the Foundation hear regularly from artists, at all career stages, that many of the challenges they face stem from a lack of support structures for visual artists, and a belief that support for art can be separated from support for artists. We remain dedicated to providing unrestricted funding through our Painters & Sculptors Grants, as a way to acknowledge that each artist knows what is best for them and what will best serve the next phase of their practice,” said Christa Blatchford, CEO of the Joan Mitchell Foundation. “We are delighted to announce and welcome our 2018 recipients. Their work is exciting and compelling, and certainly deserving of greater recognition.”

The announcement of the 2018 grantees coincides with the launch of Widening Circles: Portraits from the Joan Mitchell Foundation Artist Community at 25 Years, a project developed by the Foundation to examine the impact and importance of ongoing support for artists. Widening Circles is comprised of a book and companion exhibition, which opened on December 6, and features testimonials and studio portraits by 25 artists. The project captures the real-life experiences of working artists and highlights the realities and business of being an artist, underscoring the importance of financial stability to artistic innovation and the need for and nature of meaningful funding. The exhibition will remain open through May 31, 2019 at the Foundation’s offices at 137 W. 25th Street, 2nd Floor, with public hours Tuesdays through Fridays from 12:00 to 3:00 pm.

Learn more about the artists

Download the press release

 

 

http://joanmitchellfoundation.org/blog/painters-sculptors-grants-2018?fbclid=IwAR0nSLZmQl0nPr3MX-rOiwan0oUi0bNTFEOlaqJIvLT8h3_RJW5n4F2mafA